An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic

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An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic

Author

Albert Tobias Clay, Morris Jastrow

About this book

The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Ancient Iraq and is among the earliest known works of literary writings. Scholars believe that it originated as a series of Sumerian legends and poems about the mythological hero-king Gilgamesh, which were gathered into a longer Akkadian poem much later; the most complete version existing today is preserved on 12 clay tablets in the library collection of the 7th century BCE Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.

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Yale Oriental Series. Researches, Volume IV, 3.
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Yale Oriental Series. Researches, Volume IV, 3.

This eBook was produced by Jeroen Hellingman.

Yale Oriental Series

Researches

Volume IV

Part III

Published from the fund given to the university in memory of Mary Stevens Hammond

The Yale Tablet of the Gilgamesh Epic

The Yale Tablet of the Gilgamesh Epic

Yale Oriental Series. Researches, Volume IV, 3.

An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic

On the Basis of Recently Discovered Texts

By Morris Jastrow Jr., Ph.D., LL.D.Professor of Semitic Languages, University of Pennsylvania And Albert T. Clay, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D.Professor of Assyriology and Babylonian Literature, Yale University

Copyright, 1920, by Yale University Press

In Memory of William Max Müller (1863–1919) Whose life was devoted to Egyptological research which he greatly enriched by many contributions

Prefatory Note

The Introduction, the Commentary to the two tablets, and the Appendix, are by Professor Jastrow, and for these he assumes the sole responsibility. The text of the Yale tablet is by Professor Clay. The transliteration and the translation of the two tablets represent the joint work of the two authors. In the transliteration of the two tablets, C. E. Keiser’s “System of Accentuation for Sumero-Akkadian signs” (Yale Oriental Researches—VOL. IX, Appendix, New Haven, 1919) has been followed.