The Dark Ages, 476-918

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The Dark Ages, 476-918

Author

Charles Oman

About this book

The Dark Ages, 476-918" by Charles Oman was an educational text that helped students and non-students alike learn about the dark ages in the late 19th century when the book was first published. Finding original resources that are easy to find and easy to understand could be difficult, thus works like Oman's were very important in order to learn about the dark ages.

Contents (33)

AUTHOR’S PREFACE
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PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION
CHAPTER I ODOACER AND THEODORIC 476-493
CHAPTER II THEODORIC KING OF ITALY 493-526
CHAPTER III THE EMPERORS AT CONSTANTINOPLE 476-527
CHAPTER IV CHLODOVECH AND THE FRANKS IN GAUL 481-511
CHAPTER V JUSTINIAN AND HIS WARS A.D. 528-540
CHAPTER VI JUSTINIAN—(continued) 540-565 A.D.
CHAPTER VII THE EARLIER FRANKISH KINGS AND THEIR ORGANISATION OF GAUL 511-561.
CHAPTER VIII THE VISIGOTHS IN SPAIN 531-603
CHAPTER IX THE SUCCESSORS OF JUSTINIAN 565-610
CHAPTER X DECLINE AND DECAY OF THE MEROVINGIANS 561-656.
CHAPTER XI THE LOMBARDS IN ITALY, AND THE RISE OF THE PAPACY 568-653
CHAPTER XII HERACLIUS AND MOHAMMED 610-641
CHAPTER XIII THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE VISIGOTHS A.D. 603-711
CHAPTER XIV THE CONTEST OF THE EASTERN EMPIRE AND THE CALIPHATE 641-717
CHAPTER XV THE HISTORY OF THE GREAT MAYORS OF THE PALACE 656-720
CHAPTER XVI THE LOMBARDS AND THE PAPACY 653-743
CHAPTER XVII CHARLES MARTEL AND HIS WARS 720-41
CHAPTER XVIII THE ICONOCLAST EMPERORS—STATE OF THE EASTERN EMPIRE IN THE EIGHTH CENTURY 717-802
CHAPTER XIX PIPPIN THE SHORT—WARS OF THE FRANKS AND LOMBARDS 741-768
CHAPTER XX CHARLES THE GREAT—EARLY YEARS 768-785—CONQUEST OF LOMBARDY AND SAXONY.
CHAPTER XXI THE LATER WARS AND CONQUESTS OF CHARLES THE GREAT 785-814
CHAPTER XXII CHARLES THE GREAT AND THE EMPIRE
CHAPTER XXIII LEWIS THE PIOUS 814-840
CHAPTER XXIV DISRUPTION OF THE FRANKISH EMPIRE—THE COMING OF THE VIKINGS 840-855
CHAPTER XXV THE DARKEST HOUR—A.D. 855-887
CHAPTER XXVI ITALY AND SICILY IN THE NINTH CENTURY (827-924)
CHAPTER XXVII GERMANY 888-918
CHAPTER XXVIII THE EASTERN EMPIRE IN THE NINTH CENTURY 802-912
CHAPTER XXIX THE END OF THE NINTH CENTURY IN WESTERN EUROPE. CONCLUSION
APPENDIX TABLES OF SOVEREIGNS
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AUTHOR’S PREFACE

In spite of the very modest scale on which this book has been written, I trust that it may be of some use to students of European History. Though there are several excellent monographs in existence dealing with various sections of the period 476-918, there is no continuous general sketch in English which covers the whole of it. Gibbon’s immortal work is popularly supposed to do so, but those who have read it most carefully are best aware that it does not. I am not acquainted with any modern English book where the inquirer can find an account of the Lombard kings, or of the Mohammedan invasions of Italy and Sicily in the ninth century, or of several other not unimportant chapters in the early history of Europe. I am in hopes, therefore, that my attempt to cover the whole field between 476 and 918 may not be entirely useless to the reading public.

I must acknowledge my indebtedness to two living authors, whose works have been of the greatest possible help to me in dealing with two great sections of this period, Doctor Gustav Richter, whose admirable collection of original authorities in his Annalen des Fränkischen Reichs makes such an excellent introduction to the study of Merovingian and Carolingian times, and Professor Bury of Dublin, whose History of the Later Roman Empire has done so much for the knowledge of East-Roman affairs between 476 and 800. Nor must I omit to express my indebtedness to the kindly and diligent hands which spent so many summer hours in the laborious task of compiling my index.

A word ought, perhaps, to be added on the vexed question of the spelling of proper names. I have always chosen the most modern form in speaking of places, but in speaking of individuals I have employed that used by contemporary authorities, save in the case of a few very well known names, such as Charles, Henry, Gregory, Lewis, where archaism would savour of pedantry.

Oxford, November 1893.

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION

The author has to acknowledge much kind help in the revision of this second edition given him by the Rev. Dr. Bright, Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History; by Mr. C. H. Turner, Fellow of Magdalen College; by the Rev. F. E. Brightman, of University College; and by the unwearied compiler of the index. They have materially improved the accuracy of the book by their suggestions.

October 30, 1894.