The First Book of Adam and Eve

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The First Book of Adam and Eve

Author

Rutherford Hayes Platt

About this book

The First Book of Adam and Eve details the life and times of Adam and Eve after they were expelled from the garden to the time that Cain kills his brother Abel. It tells of Adam and Eve's first dwelling - the Cave of Treasures; their trials and temptations; Satan's many apparitions to them; the birth of Cain, Abel, and their twin sisters; and Cain's love for his beautiful twin sister, Luluwa, whom Adam and Eve wished to join to Abel.

Contents (27)

Prologue
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Chapter I - The crystal sea, God commands Adam, expelled from Eden, to live in the Cave of Treasures.
Chapter II - Adam and Eve faint when they leave the Garden. God sends His Word to encourage them.
Chapter III - Concerning the promise of the great five and a half days.
Chapter IV - Adam mourns over the changed conditions. Adam and Eve enter the Cave of Treasures.
Chapter V - Eve makes a noble and emotional intercession, taking the blame on herself.
Chapter VI - God's reprimand to Adam and Eve in which he points out how and why they sinned.
Chapter VII - The beasts are appeased.
Chapter VIII - The "Bright Nature" of man is taken away.
Chapter IX - Water from the Tree of Life. Adam and Eve near drowning.
Chapter X - Their bodies need water after they leave the garden.
Chapter XI - A recollection of the glorious days in the Garden.
Chapter XII - How darkness came between Adam and Eve.
Chapter XIII - The fall of Adam. Why night and day were created.
Chapter XIV - The earliest prophesy of the coming of Christ.
Chapter XV - Adam and Eve grieve over the suffering of God to save them from their sins.
Chapter XVI - The first sunrise. Adam and Eve think it is a fire coming to burn them.
Chapter XVII - The Chapter of the Serpent.
Chapter XVIII - The mortal combat with the serpent.
Chapter XIX - Beasts made subject to Adam.
Chapter XX - Adam wishes to protect Eve.
Chapter XXI - Adam and Eve attempt suicide.
Chapter XXII - Adam in a gracious mood.
Chapter XXIII - Adam and Eve strengthen themselves and make the first altar ever built.
Chapter XXIV - A vivid prophecy of the life and death of Christ.
Chapter XXV - God represented as merciful and loving. The establishing of worship.
Chapter XXVI - A beautiful prophecy of eternal life and joy (v. 15). The fall of night.

Prologue

The First Book of Adam and Eve details the life and times of Adam and Eve after they were expelled from the garden to the time that Cain kills his brother Abel. It tells of Adam and Eve's first dwelling—the Cave of Treasures; their trials and temptations; Satan's many apparitions to them; the birth of Cain, Abel, and their twin sisters; and Cain's love for his beautiful twin sister, Luluwa, whom Adam and Eve wished to join to Abel.

This book is considered by many scholars to be part of the "Pseudepigrapha" (soo-duh-pig-ruh-fuh). The "Pseudepigrapha" is a collection of historical biblical works that are considered to be fiction. Because of that stigma, this book was not included in the compilation of the Holy Bible. This book is a written history of what happened in the days of Adam and Eve after they were cast out of the garden. Although considered to be pseudepigraphic by some, it carries significant meaning and insight into events of that time. It is doubtful that these writings could have survived all the many centuries if there were no substance to them.

This book is simply a version of an account handed down by word of mouth, from generation to generation, linking the time that the first human life was created to the time when somebody finally decided to write it down. This particular version is the work of unknown Egyptians. The lack of historical allusion makes it difficult to precisely date the writing, however, using other pseudepigraphical works as a reference, it was probably written a few hundred years before the birth of Christ. Parts of this version are found in the Jewish Talmud, and the Islamic Koran, showing what a vital role it played in the original literature of human wisdom. The Egyptian author wrote in Arabic, but later translations were found written in Ethiopic. The present English translation was translated in the late 1800's by Dr. S. C. Malan and Dr. E. Trumpp. They translated into King James English from both the Arabic version and the Ethiopic version which was then published in The Forgotten Books of Eden in 1927 by The World Publishing Company. In 1995, the text was extracted from a copy of The Forgotten Books of Eden and converted to electronic form by Dennis Hawkins. It was then translated into more modern English by simply exchanging 'Thou' s for 'You's, 'Art's for 'Are's, and so forth. The text was then carefully re-read to ensure its integrity.