The Scientific American Boy; Or, The Camp at Willow Clump Island

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The Scientific American Boy; Or, The Camp at Willow Clump Island

Author

A. Russell Bond

About this book

Published by Scientific American in 1905, the book tells the story of a group of boys who explore Clump Island, a fictional place where boys could be boys. As they explore the island, the young friends are able to test their skills building all kinds of things. As the first in the Scientific American Boy series, this is a collection of science and nature activities for boys told in a fictional story. Includes diagrams and illustrations.

Contents (26)

PREFACE
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CHAPTER I. “BILL.”
CHAPTER II. SKATE SAILS.
CHAPTER III. SNOW SHOES, SKIS AND SWAMP SHOES.
CHAPTER IV. TENT MAKING.
CHAPTER V. PREPARING FOR THE EXPEDITION.
CHAPTER VI. OFF TO THE ISLAND.
CHAPTER VII. SURVEYING.
CHAPTER VIII. SWIMMING.
CHAPTER IX. BRIDGE BUILDING.
CHAPTER X. CANVAS CANOES.
CHAPTER XI. HOUSE BUILDING.
CHAPTER XII. TROUBLE WITH THE TRAMPS.
CHAPTER XIII. WIGWAGGING AND HELIOGRAPHING.
CHAPTER XIV. ICE BOATS, SLEDGES AND TOBOGGANS.
CHAPTER XV. THE SUBTERRANEAN CLUB.
CHAPTER XVI. SCOOTERS.
CHAPTER XVII. AN ARCTIC EXPEDITION.
CHAPTER XVIII. TRAMPING OUTFITS.
CHAPTER XIX. THE LAND YACHT.
CHAPTER XX. EASTER VACATION.
CHAPTER XXI. THE WATER WHEEL.
CHAPTER XXII. THE LOG CABIN.
CHAPTER XXIII. THE WINDMILL.
CHAPTER XXIV. THE GRAVITY RAILROAD.
CHAPTER XXV. THE CANTILEVER BRIDGE.

PREFACE

All boys are nature lovers. Nothing appeals to them more than a summer vacation in the woods where they can escape from the restraints of civilization and live a life of freedom. Now, it may appear to be a bit of presumption to attempt to advise the boy camper how to spend his time. Surely the novelty of outdoor life, the fascinating charm of his surroundings, will provide him plenty of entertainment.

But, after all, a camp generally affords but two major amusements, hunting and fishing. These have been fully covered by a vast number of books. However, there is another side of camp life, particularly in a boys’ camp, which has been very little dealt with, namely, the exercise of one’s ingenuity in creating out of the limited resources at hand such devices and articles as will add to one’s personal comfort and welfare. It is, therefore, the aim of this book to suggest certain diversions of this character for the boy camper which, aside from affording him plenty of physical exercise, will also develop his mental faculties, and above all stimulate that natural genius which is characteristic of every typical American boy. To this end the story contains descriptions of a large collection of articles which can be made by any boy of average intelligence, not only in the camp but at home as well.

The use of a narrative to connect the various incidents marks a departure in this class of book, and it is believed that the matter will thus be made more realistic and interesting. In all cases full directions are given for making the various articles. While it is not presumed that the directions will be slavishly followed, for this would defeat the general aim of the work, yet all the principal dimensions are given so that they can be used, if desired.

I beg to acknowledge the courtesy of Mr. Daniel C. Beard and Mr. Henry D. Cochrane in supplying a number of photographs. The directions for making the lee boards (page 119) were obtained from data furnished by the latter. Many of the details recorded in the chapter on Tramping Outfits are to be accredited to Mr. Edward Thorpe. In the preparation of this book I have received valuable assistance from my colleague, Mr. A. A. Hopkins.

A. RUSSELL BOND.

New York, October, 1905.

Map of Willow Clump Island and Vicinity.